tinyallotment

Growing as much food on as little land for as little money as possible

55 Vegetables in 4 square feet? Part1

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Introducing the barrel garden.

This is a picture of a mature barrel garden from thee tower garden project

Barrel gardens are fantastic. They are cheap and easy to build, you can grow a massive amount of food in a tiny footprint, they retain and recycle water and nutrients, they require very little weeding, they have an integrated composting wormery that automatically fertilises your barrel and deals with kitchen waste, they produce fantastic worm casting you can either  reuse in the barrel or on your garden.You can now grow vegetables and soft fruits anywhere even if you only have a small courtyard or balcony. You can even easily look after a barrel garden from a wheelchair.

“WOW, Where can I get one of these fantastic gardens?” I hear you ask. Well, I’m sure if you searched hard enough you could find someone who supplies them but the best way is to roll up your sleeves and build one yourself. (If you are having trouble finding a barrel garden and you really can’t build one yourself then get in touch and we can discuss me building one for you).

Right, let’s get started. First of all you are going to need a barrel. In this demonstration I am going to use a 205Lt ‘Tight Head’ barrel. Tight head barrels only have a couple of small openings in the top so you will have to cut the top off. You might find an ‘Open Top Keg’ type barrel that have a removable lid but it doesn’t really matter. It only takes a few minutes to remover the top of a tight head barrel.

When looking for a barrel for this type of project make sure you get a food grade barrel that has only be used to carry foodstuffs. Places to look might be large food production companies, bakeries, breweries etc. Also ask on freecycle or streetbank.

I started with a tight head barrel I have had hanging around for about 5 years.

Tight head barrel

First job was cut the top off. You could do this with an electric jigsaw but me being me plus the fact that I don’t have electricity at the allotment I used a great little hand saw that was perfect for the job.

Plasterboard saw

It only took about 10 minutes to cut the top off and it ended up being quite a neat job. I don’t think I could have done it much quicker with a jigsaw to be honest by the time I set it up and everything.

Barrel with the top removed

Next job was to drill the drain holes in the bottom of the barrel. This allows any excess water to drain away so the barrel doesn’t become waterlogged. This is also where you collect all the lovely nutrient rich water that can be put back in the top of the barrel. That is one of the great things about the barrel garden. Nothing is wasted.

As normal I use a great hand tool that has all but disappeared since the advent of the battery drill. The hand drill.

You can still buy these brand new but you will probably get a better quality tool if you buy an old one from a cat boot.

Hand drill

We just want to drill a series of holes to allow the water to drain but not to let the soil out. I tried for some sort of pattern but that didn’t work did it.

Drain holes

In the next instalment we will be marking out, cutting and forming the 50 grow pockets in the sides of the barrel.

There were some sprouts ready for harvest

Brussels Sprouts

And leeks

Leeks

And the Sedum which I used in the header of this blog is looking fantastic now it is in flower

Sedum

more on the barrel garden very soon

paul

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Author: tinyallotment

Dedicated to living a simple, independent, self reliant life where money is not the main factor. My dream is to engineer a life that requires very little from the outside world. I would like to provide my own shelter, collect my own water, grow, catch, hunt, forage my own food, create my own energy and deal with my own waste. This dream all starts in a tiny allotment in Cornwall where I will be experimenting in growing food, generating energy and dealing with waste.

5 thoughts on “55 Vegetables in 4 square feet? Part1

  1. Pingback: 55 Vegetables in 4 square feet? Part2 | tinyallotment

  2. Pingback: 55 Vegetables in 4 square feet? Part 3 | tinyallotment

  3. Pingback: April 2015 Update | tinyallotment

  4. Looking into barrel container for my strawberries, I have large garden but soon moving out so barrel idea fantastic thanks Paul kind regards jane

    • Thanks Jane. I wouldn’t want to move mine now it is full of soil but if you built it on a pallet before filling it up you could move it with a pallet truck. Maybe I need to design one on wheels.
      If you do build one, please send some pictures when it is done.
      Good luck with the move and the barrel garden.
      Paul

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